A Floating House?

Monday, February 14, 2011

Architecture is a forever changing style and a way for home owners to express themselves. We can see how styles have changed from A-frame roofing to grandiose arching cathedral ceilings, and from sprawling ‘McMansions’ (formerly we posted about a 1 billion dollar, 27 floor home) to the preference of younger generations for movable ‘mini’ homes. I’ve even seen a debate about one man in China living in a portable “egg-shaped home” that he moves about the streets from night to night. It has no bathroom, no shower, no kitchen. Is it a tent, or a home?

Those of us living in Colorado have seen some interesting feats of architecture. If you’ve ever driven the I-70 corridor or seen “Charlie’s Angels” in which it was featured, you’ve definitely seen one of our most famous homes that locals lovingly call “The Spaceship.” Perched upon frail looking beams, this circular home seems to topple and spin and gives viewers an uneasy feeling that “The Spaceship” may take off and return to the skies.

The “Floating House” featured in an article from the Wall Street Journal and Juliet Chung entitled “Living Room Ready for Liftoff”is certainly one to compete with the uneasy feeling that “The Spaceship” instills in viewers. Shaped in a lazy “V” with one arm resting on the hill side and the other extending 14-feet off of the ground with absolutely no suspension under it, many viewers feel like it could easily teeter-totter onto it’s airborne arm.

It’s designer and owner, Warren Schwartz, said he wanted his home to have an “airy” feeling and that it was inspired by the floating bridge at the Grand Canyon. According to Schwartz, the floating rectangular glass wing of the home can withstand the weight of 60 people or several thousand pounds on its roof. How does it float without any support underneath? Apparently the home is well anchored into the hillside with a large underground basement.

The decor inside the home matches the designer’s futuristic exterior. Inside, where most homes have bedroom walls, this one has sandblasted panes of glass. The furniture is minimalistic and everything stays within a clean color palette of white, grey, and silver. The glass home has one sole purpose; to focus on the spectacular views outside. View images.

What would your dream home look like? Architecture today knows no bounds.

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